Maude Abbott and the Holmes Heart

Published March 18, 2011 | One response so far
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Today is the 142nd birthday of an amazing Canadian researcher and physician– Dr. Maude Abbott. It’s hard to sum up in a few words just how awesome this lady was. Briefly, she was orphaned as a child and was raised by her grandmother. After graduating high school, she joined one of the first groups of
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Marzieh Ghiasi
  • Jan. 3rd, 2011 · Starting thesis…

    … only 200 paragraphs to go! #
  • Science journal submissions… so it begins!

    Published January 02, 2011 | No responses yet
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    Tonight is MSURJ’s submission deadline. Every year we, the editors of the journal, sit in front of our computer screens– refreshing the journal’s inbox fervently– and watch the submissions roll in. In the past three years I’ve noticed that the submissions tend to come in at around the same times– a day before, four hours
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    Marzieh Ghiasi

    Out to the printers…

    Published April 02, 2010 | No responses yet
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    I have exciting news! Today we sent out the final version of MSURJ (the McGill Science Undergraduate Research Journal) to the printers. We’ve completely revamped the look of the journal from previous years, and we have more research articles than ever. Our launch is in about a week when everything is going to come together,
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    Marzieh Ghiasi

    Explaining Everything, Explaining Anything

    Published March 19, 2010 | 5 responses so far
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    The following are reflections on this year’s Mini-Beatty Public Lecture “Life, the Universe and Nothing: A Cosmic Mystery Story” held by Dr. Lawrence M. Krauss held on March 1st, 2010 at McGill University. Edwin Hubble via Vision. Science and its academic disciplines have shaped and transformed our modern world arguably more so than any other
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    Marzieh Ghiasi

    Billions suspended in a sunbeam

    Published November 09, 2009 | No responses yet
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    Today is writer and scientist Carl Sagan‘s 75th birthday. Carl Sagan is remembered for his remarkable ability to take scientific knowledge and present it in an elegant and comprehensive way to the broader public. An ability that I’ve truly come to appreciate as I’ve become more involved with communicating science. But it’s not just limited
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    Marzieh Ghiasi

    Sphinx or Science (Francis Bacon)

    Published September 21, 2009 | 3 responses so far
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    I read this magnificent piece a couple of weeks ago and it left me with a lot to digest, and so I wanted to share it. In a world where scientific theories like evolution still have not found widespread acceptance in the public, it seems that many are still unwilling to face, what Bacon calls
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    Marzieh Ghiasi

    Darwin, DNA and, “many more details”

    Published February 16, 2009 | One response so far
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    http://www.mcgilldaily.com/article/18021 Darwin, DNA and, “many more details” By Marzieh Ghiasi Monday, Feb 16th, 2009 While evolution has formed the core foundation of biology, 150 years since Darwin’s theory of evolution, was published, it remains as controversial as ever. According to a 2007 poll released by Angus Reid Global Monitor, only 59 per cent of Canadians
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    Marzieh Ghiasi

    Hookworms and anemia in women

    Published September 26, 2008 | No responses yet
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    As posted in Neglected Tropical Diseases Society Science Daily reports of a recent study in the PLoS showing that almost 7 million pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa are infected with hookworms and at risk for anemia. According to the study, completed through systemic investigation of literature, 37.7 million women in the region, and millions more
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    Marzieh Ghiasi

    Parasites may boost HIV infection rates

    Published July 24, 2008 | No responses yet
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    As posted in Neglected Tropical Diseases Society The New Scientist reports of a recently released publication by Chenin et al. suggesting that parasitic infections in co-endemic regions may account for the greater rates of HIV-1 infections in these regions. “Evan Secor of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and his colleagues infected macaques
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    Marzieh Ghiasi